345 Middlefield Rd
Menlo Park, California 94025

The U.S. Geological Survey's showcase of scientific research at its Menlo Park Science Center will take place on Saturday, June 3 and Sunday, June 4. The Menlo Park Science Center is located at 345 Middlefield Road in Menlo Park, California.

Take advantage of this special opportunity to:

? Talk with scientists about their work
? Enjoy hands-on exhibits and displays of USGS research
? Learn about earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, tsunamis, and other natural hazards
? Learn about the dynamic environment of the San Francisco Bay Region
? See exhibits about the 1906 San Francisco earthquake
? Learn about biological-resource monitoring
? Learn about surface water pollution
? Learn about remote sensing
? Bring your favorite rock, fossil, or mineral for identification
? Purchase USGS and California Geological Survey books and maps
? Purchase authographed books by USGS authors, 1906 earthquake authors, mystery writers, and others
? Purchase earth science childrens books, puzzles, souvenirs, and more
? Watch award-winning videos

Meet The Authors

Book Signing and more!
Come meet the authors and get your own autographed copy of their books! We are featuring a selection of outstanding books on earth science subjects such as the 1906 earthquake (3-D images, eyewitness accounts, a novel), faults in California, earthquake research, geology of the San Francisco Bay area, Clarence King (famous geologist and first Director of the USGS), the High Sierras, great mystery books that incorporate geology, and the latest version of the USGS map, "This Dynamic Planet." We will also feature a DVD on the 1906 earthquake.
Check out our authors and see their schedules. To learn more about an author, select their name. To learn more about their book or DVD, select the title. Book authors are located near the GeoKids sales tent. Map authors are located in the Map Sales Office in Building 3.

Official Website: http://openhouse.wr.usgs.gov

Added by USGS Western Region on November 18, 2005



The USGS rocks. HA!